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These pictures were taken in May 1999 with a Canon EOS 500N camera. Our 60 Hudson POP consists of 7 23" equipment cabinets and 2 wall-mounted interconnect cabinets.

Click on the smaller image to display the full-size image. Important Note: The larger images have been known to crash older versions of some web browsers, in particular the 16-bit versions of Netscape.

Also, some of the smaller images have a button to the right, which you can click to see a similar historical view (February 1995).

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The front of our cabinets. The 7 blue cabinets are the New York Net POP. To the right, you can see two wall-mounted beige cabinets used for T1 delivery and interconnects. The grey cabinets to the left are some sort of cross-country video distribution system - the monitor is usually showing various ABC news programs.


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The backs of our cabinets. The caged-in area to the left is another MFS customer who seems to enjoy encroaching on our space. When we complained that the aisle was too narrow, MFS said this encroachment was allowable. They did not respond when I said "Ok, how about we put the same cage on the back of our cabinets, and you can lower the tech from the ceiling with a winch when he needs to work on it?". Further, when we said we needed access to the floor under the tiles, they sent a contractor with a Sawzall to cut the floor tiles (as you can see in the picture). However, the contractor didn't look under the floor before he cut the tiles. Fortunately, he missed all of the cables carrying data, but he did cut through the floor supports and part of the floor collapsed. It is now supported by a mish-mash of electrical boxes and other odds and ends.


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Our right-most cabinet, better known as "4.07". From the top, this cabinet holds 2 shelves of T1 CSU's, an alarm monitoring panel, a terminal server and modem (for maintenance), a Cisco 3620 and T1 CSU connecting our customer in Israel, and NYC1, a Cisco 7513 router. Above the cabinet you can see the red and black DC power feeders as well as the gray fiber optic distribution ducting.


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This is the view from the back of the 4.07 cabinet. Note all the made-to-length cables and the overall neatness of the wiring. On the right side, you can see the DC power cables for the CSU shelves, and the vertical blue conduit carries DC power for the 7513 in the bottom of the cabinet. On the CSU shelves, the yellow cables are for T1's and the dark blue ones are the serial cables connecting the CSU's to the Cisco 7513 router below.


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Moving down the cabinet, this view shows a custom-made fan tray for cooling the CSU shelf. Below that is our central alarm monitoring panel, which has a local alarm buzzer as well as reporting to our central SNMP monitoring system. On the shelf at the bottom of the picture is a DEC terminal server used to connect the console ports of the various systems, so we have out-of-band management access in the event of network problems.


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A view of the back of the Cisco 7513 router (NYC1), showing the card cage. On the left are SSIP controllers (for the CSU shelves). Next is a 4-port T3 card for point-to-point T3's (note the 2 loopback cables for future expansion), a blank slot (for expansion), a 2-port MIP card for ISDN PRI's, a card with one Fast Ethernet (connecting to NYC0) and 8 Ethernets (connecting to various hubs and systems in the POP). Next is the RSP4 CPU, an empty slot for a second RSP, and 2 4-port T3 cards for 8 point-to-point T3's. Next are 3 cards with two channelized T3's on each, for a total of 168 T1's. Most of these T1's are point-to-point links to customers, but some connect to Frame Relay clouds or are broken down futher to serve 56K or 128K customers. The green tags label the cables with the customer name, circuit ID and controller/slot information. The spiral "bungee cord" to the right is a permanently-mounted antistatic strap. At the left and right edges of the picture, you can see the AC outlet strips in this cabinet.


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This picture shows the bottom of the 7513, with the DC power input cables. The bottoms of the AC outlet strips are also visible (with their circuit breaker ID labels). The heavy green wires are the grounding wires for the cabinet and the 7513 power supplies.


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The 4.06 cabinet, which contains a Bell Atlantic (formerly NYNEX) OC-12 SONET multiplexor, NYC0, a Cisco 7507 router, and three Ethernet hubs.


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The back of the OC-12 SONET multiplexor. There's a bit of a story behind this - Bell Atlantic/NY wants to install a whole cabinet full of ugly wiring when they put SONET gear at a customer site. For some reason, this cabinet was delivered to the 12th floor (we're on the 15th floor). The Bell Atlantic rep was bringing it upstairs one piece at a time, and I said "why don't I install this while you're bringing up more parts?". That's why this is installed so neatly...


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This is the back of NYC0. The yellow fibers in the bottom of the picture are an OC-3 (155Mbit/second) link to the Verio backbone. The gray cables in the center are 2 T3's - one to MAE-East and one to another POP. The black cable with the white lump on it is the Fast Ethernet link to NYC1. To the left you can see the white innerduct carrying the Bell Atlantic fiber to their mux and the spiral-wrap that protects the OC-3 as it runs between cabinets. To the left of the innerduct, you can see the back of a "zip strip" in the adjoining cabinet. We use these zip strips for cable management within the cabinets. On the right of the picture is the AC outlet strip for this cabinet.


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Cabinet 4.05, which contains the DC power feed and a Cisco AS5300 access server. The DC power panel is a Hendry panel with a stock model number, but they had never built this particular model until we ordered it. It is unusual in that it has two 40A circuit breakers, used to power the 7513, as well as 20 fuse positions. These fuse positions are used to power other devices, such as the CSU shelves, Bell Atlantic SONET mux, and the AS5300.


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The back view of the DC power panel and Cisco AS5300. Again, note the made-to-length and labeled cables. The yellow cables on the AS5300 are 4 ISDN PRI lines, while the purple one is the Ethernet. The flat black cable and modular-to-DB25 adapter is for the console. To the right are the DC power leads. On the DC power panel, note the heat-shrink tubing and clear plastic guard - with the current that's available there, it is very important to protect the connections (see the next picture).


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This is the MFS battery room that provides DC power for the colocation area. At the moment, we are the heaviest consumer of DC power, at about 40 Amps per leg. The total consumption in the colocation space is about 55 Amps per leg. Off to the right (not visible in this picture) are the battery chargers. To get an idea of the size of the batteries, the floor tiles are 2 feet square. These batterys can provide 800 Amps for an extended period of time (and there is generator backup as well). These batteries weigh over 50,000 pounds total.


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Telebit NetBlazer ST and a rack of Microcom 28.8 modems. We are migrating customers to the Cisco AS5300 at this time, and this equipment is soon to be removed.


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The back of the NetBlazer ST and Microcom modem rack. Unfortunately, NetBlazers use large, unwieldy "pods" for their serial ports, and the Microcom modem shelves have their serial connectors in a rather inconvenient place. Our solution was these plywood backboards, on which we mounted the NetBlazer pods and ran cables to the Microcom serial connectors.


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An APC Matrix 5000 UPS with 5 SmartCell batteries. We have two of these in our NYC POP, to power our AC loads until the MFS backup generator starts. Our DC equipment is powered by the batteries shown in a previous photo.


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The back of the Matrix 5000 UPS. In this view you can see the very heavy DC power cables and the much smaller control cables. The box on top of the UPS is the SNMP management controller for the UPS.


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As we filled up the cabinets with equipment, we ran out of places to store our tools. This is the inside of the rear door of cabinet 4.04, showing some tool shelves we installed.


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This picture shows our "small number" of analog phone lines. The 66 blocks with blue covers are delivery of MFS and Bell Atlantic circuits, while the 66 blocks with clear covers below them connect equipment in various other cabinets. To reconfigure phone numbers, we only have to replace the jumpers between the 66 blocks. Above the 66 blocks, you can see a fiber shelf with yellow fiber jumpers. This is where MFS delivers our OC-3 circuit.


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We still operate some 14.4 dialup modems for some customers. These will probably be moved to the Cisco AS5300 as time permits. To the left you can see one of our custom built power supplies. Standalone modems normally use individual "wall wart" transformers. This supply takes the place of 16 such transformers.


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The same stack of 14.4 modems and power supply, viewed from the back. At the top you can see the outlet strip that delivers the phone lines, and at the bottom a DEC terminal server is visible.


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Our on-site maintenance PC. In this picture, you can see the keyboard, monitor, mouse and speakers. Also present are a telephone and a bottle of Advil.


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The same cabinet, looking a bit higher up. Here you can see the PC, some CD's, a label printer, some manuals, and a box of Kleenex. Above the Kleenex box is the back of the fiber patch panel. This equipment (and the monitor below it) is in the same cabinet as the 66 blocks from a prior photo. Since we never need to get to the backs of the 66 blocks or the back of the computer/monitor, there is no wasted space.


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These cabinets are used for T1 deliveries to us by MFS and NYNEX. The telcos are given access to the bottom cabinet, and that is where they hand off circuits to us. The top cabinet is connected to our blue cabinets by 25-pair cables. This way we can move T1 circuits around our cabinets without having to involve the telco. At one time we had over 60 T1's delivered this way - today it is a little over a dozen, as most T1's are delivered to us on channelized T3's.


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